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You are What You Eat

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Last Updated on Saturday, 15 July 2017 14:58

(Mu‘aazah bintu ‘Abdillah Al-‘Adawiyyah [rahimahallah] #3)

Ummul Aswad Al-‘Adawiyyah (rahimahallah) was a woman who had been breastfed by Mu‘aazah Al-‘Adawiyyah (rahimahallah).

Mu‘aazah Al-‘Adawiyyah (rahimahallah) once said to Ummul Aswad (rahimahallah), “Do not spoil the pains that I took in breastfeeding you by eating haraam, for I did all that was possible to ensure that I ate only halaal when feeding you. Therefore, strive to consume only halaal so that you will perhaps be blessed to serve Allah Ta‘ala and be pleased with His decree.”

Ummul Aswad (rahimahallah) would thereafter mention, “If I ever partook of food that was even doubtful in nature, the result would be that I would either be deprived of fulfilling a fardh action or some other ‘ibaadah that I would normally carry out with punctuality on a daily basis.” (Sifatus Safwah vol.2, pg. 246)

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Nurturing the Relationship

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Last Updated on Monday, 10 July 2017 15:39

There are few methods that express love as eloquently as speech. Hence, a newly-wed couple who have the misfortune of living apart for some time will often compensate for their separation by remaining glued to their phones, speaking to each other for hours on end. On the contrary, when two people have hatred and enmity for one another, they make it a point to avoid speaking to each other.

During the month of Ramadhaan, Muslims the world over remained glued to the Quraan Majeed, earnestly conversing with Allah Ta‘ala. The more they recited the Quraan Majeed, the more their love for Allah Ta‘ala grew and the closer to Him they became. However, how many of us have continued to converse with Allah Ta‘ala, through reciting the Quraan Majeed daily, as we used to in the month of Ramadhaan? Similarly, how many of us are still conversing with Allah Ta‘ala through the direct-line of du‘aa, as we used to during the month of Ramadhaan?

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The Deep Desire for Good Deeds

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Last Updated on Monday, 10 July 2017 15:13

Sa’d bin Abi Waqqaas (radhiyallahu ‘anhu) narrates the following:

I noticed my brother, ‘Umair bin Abi Waqqaas (radhiyallahu ‘anhu), attempting to remain hidden before Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam) inspected us for the departure to Badr. I thus asked him, “What is the matter, O my brother?” He replied, “I fear that Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam) will see me and regard me to be too small. Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam) will thus send me away, whereas I deeply desire to join the expedition as it is possible that Allah Ta‘ala will bless me with martyrdom.”

My brother thereafter came before Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam), and Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam) regarded him to be too small to join the expedition to Badr. Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam) thus sent him away saying, “Go back.” However, ‘Umair (radhiyallahu ‘anhu) began to cry (out of disappointment as he wished to join the expedition and be blessed with martyrdom). Seeing him cry, Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam) allowed him to join the expedition.

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Food for the Soul

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Last Updated on Saturday, 08 July 2017 15:18

Staring into the starlit sky,

sighting the crescent moon.

Ramadhaan has at last come by,

and not a moment too soon.

 

Depending on people’s state of heart,

this month has different meaning.

Some greedily fill the grocery cart,

while others see spiritual healing.

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Haleem and Naan … or a Revolutionary Ramadhaan?

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Last Updated on Saturday, 08 July 2017 15:12

People often speak about the ‘one special moment’ that changed everything in their lives. For some, it’s the moment when they were struck by a brainwave that led to a revolutionary invention which rocketed them to fame and fortune. For a professional sportsman, it’s often the moment when they signed onto the team or scored the crucial goal. I am neither a sports star nor a genius inventor. I am merely an ordinary Muslimah, like most of you out there, and my life did not change in a ‘single magical moment’. Instead, my entire life changed in a single Ramadhaan...

I remember the period with crystal clarity. I was 18 years old, the countdown for the dreaded final matric exams had commenced and Ramadhaan was around the corner. Although I put up a brave front, I would never admit it, but my world was in turmoil and I was, in general, miserable, confused, stressed out and even a little scared.

I was always considered intelligent and never had to work hard to produce good grades. As I progressed through the years in school, my above-average marks impressed both my teachers and family. While I was content to be the homely type and never entertained visions of varsity after school, they began to plot the course that my life would follow, taking it for granted that I would be complacent and would meekly ‘do as I was told’. I remember Aunty Khairoon declare, with her mehndi-dyed finger wagging under my nose, “You got brains, bachu (darling)! You a bright girl! Can’t waste that potential frying puri patha in the kitchen!”

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