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Consumer or Consumed?

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Last Updated on Wednesday, 04 November 2020 16:36

Smash burgers, freak shakes and Wagyu steaks… Just 10-15 years ago, these words would have been meaningless to most people. Yet, with the passage of time and progression of social media, there are now few people who are NOT acquainted with these words.

Not too long ago, eating takeout food or dining at a restaurant was a rare treat, with even the wealthy not indulging in such a luxury more than once a week. However, it is now common for even middle-class households to buy food multiple times a week. The question we must nevertheless ask ourselves is, “At what cost?”

The truth of the matter is that we no longer consume food – rather, many of us are ‘consumed’ by food. Via Facebook and Instagram, we are, on a daily basis, exposed to adverts and reviews of the latest eating establishments and the newest gastronomic innovations. Pop-ups, sit downs and takeaways – they all market their businesses, on their own social media pages and via ‘food bloggers’, trying to attract as much interest and business as they can. For this purpose, a raving review and flattering photo of the food goes a long way – to stimulating the salivary glands and making the viewer’s mouths pool with drool in hungry anticipation.

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Instant Acceptance with no Reluctance

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Last Updated on Monday, 02 November 2020 08:33

Safiyyah bintu Shaibah (rahimahallah) reports:

On one occasion, we were in the company of Sayyidah ‘Aaishah (radhiyallahu ‘anha) when we made mention of the women of the Quraish and their great virtue. Sayyidah ‘Aaishah (radhiyallahu ‘anha) said, “Certainly, the women of the Quraish possess great virtue. However, by Allah, I have not seen women more virtuous than the women of the Ansaar or greater than them in accepting the command of the Quraan and bringing imaan in that which was revealed.”

(Sayyidah ‘Aaishah (radhiyallahu ‘anha) then elaborated saying,) “When the verse of Surah Noor was revealed:

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Safeguarding Himself from Sin

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Last Updated on Monday, 26 October 2020 14:02

Khaarijah bin Mus‘ab (rahimahullah) mentions the following incident:

On one occasion, I departed for hajj, leaving my slave girl in the care of Imaam Abu Haneefah (rahimahullah).

I remained in Makkah Mukarramah for approximately four months, and upon my return, I asked Imaam Abu Haneefah (rahimahullah), “How did you find the work and character of this slave girl?” He replied, “The person who studies the Quraan Majeed and acquires the knowledge of permissible and impermissible for the (benefit of the) people (i.e. he imparts the injunctions of Deen to the people) needs to safeguard himself from falling into fitnah (sin). By Allah! From the time you left, until the time you returned, I did not look at your slave girl!”

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The Ultimate Concern

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Last Updated on Monday, 19 October 2020 16:00

On the occasion of the Conquest of Makkah Mukarramah, Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam) granted general amnesty to the people. However, there were a few, select individuals who were exempt from this amnesty on account of the severe enmity they bore against Islam and the crimes they had perpetrated against the Muslims.

Among these people was Sayyiduna ‘Ikrimah (radhiyallahu ‘anhu), the son of Abu Jahal. Anticipating that the Muslims would kill him, Sayyiduna ‘Ikrimah (radhiyallahu ‘anhu) fled from Makkah Mukarramah, heading towards Yemen.

In the interim, his wife (who was also his cousin), Sayyidah Ummu Hakeem (radhiyallahu ‘anha), accepted Islam. She came to Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam) and said, “O Rasul of Allah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam)! ‘Ikrimah has fled from you towards Yemen, and he fears that you will have him killed, so please grant him amnesty!” On her request, Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam) granted amnesty to ‘Ikrimah (radhiyallahu ‘anhu). She thereafter asked Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam)s for permission to go after her husband and bring him back, and Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam) granted her permission.

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Societal Acceptance

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Last Updated on Saturday, 17 October 2020 08:31

Imagine a person respected in society who is caught stealing from old, vulnerable widows, leaving them penniless and destitute. He is apprehended red-handed, and before long, the news of his heartless crime is broadcasted to the public. Obviously, this person’s dignity and reputation will be in complete shreds – if not utterly obliterated – and he will have no place to safely show his face. In fact, even his family will hang their heads out of shame and embarrassment due to being associated with him. The reason? – Society deems this deed to be extremely evil and thus severely condemns those who perpetrate it.

As Muslims, it is the Deen of Allah Ta‘ala that is our gauge to determine what is reprehensible and what is acceptable. Thus, a true Muslim will be disgusted by the acts that Deen considers disgusting, and will find no objection with an action that Deen deems acceptable. Accordingly, in the example above, a Muslim will also be disgusted, as sharee‘ah totally condemns the crime of theft. However, what if society deems an action acceptable, but Islam considers it reprehensible?

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