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Devotion to Deen

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Monday, 29 January 2018 16:16

(Sayyidah Ummu Habeebah [radhiyallahu ‘anha] – Part Four)

Abu Sufyaan (radhiyallahu ‘anhu), the father of Ummu Habeebah (radhiyallahu ‘anha), had accepted Islam on the occasion of the conquest of Makkah. He passed away many years later, during the khilaafat of ‘Uthmaan (radhiyallahu ‘anhu).

Three days after the news of Abu Sufyaan’s (radhiyallahu ‘anhu) demise was broken to Ummu Habeebah (radhiyallahu ‘anha), she took perfume and applied it to herself saying, “I have no need to apply perfume. (However, I am doing so because) I heard Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam) mention, ‘It is not permissible for any woman who believes in Allah Ta‘ala and the last day to mourn for more than three days, except upon her husband, as (in the case where her husband passes away,) she will mourn over him for four months and ten days.’” (Saheeh Muslim #3725)

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GPS Programming

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Friday, 26 January 2018 06:24

From Garmin to TomTom and every GPS app besides – the choices are endless when it comes to finding a solution to safe navigation and guidance to the destination. With a GPS in hand, a person feels at home on even foreign roads, casually driving about and comfortably commuting from one point to the next.

However, imagine for a moment that a person is all alone and driving through the wilderness at night. Suddenly, he enters an area that is ill-reputed to be fraught with hijackers and robbers. As he enters this area, his GPS system goes absolutely haywire. The system ‘speaks’ and tells him to turn left, but when he glances at the screen, it clearly shows that he should proceed straight ahead without taking any turns. It is not farfetched to believe that this person would break out into a sweat and panic, as he would not know which direction to take in this most dangerous of places.

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My Kind, Cruel Mother

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Monday, 01 January 2018 08:47

Every cook, from a celebrity chef to a humble homemaker, relies on a few essential ingredients. Safely nestled within their ‘masala dubbah’ (spice box) are powders and pods which though small in quantity, are potent in taste. It is on the foundation of these vital ingredients that the cook exercises her culinary skill, preparing dishes that have the potential to either tantalize the taste buds or poison the palate.

Every cook worth her salt knows that some ingredients are absolutely necessary in most dishes, yet always cause tears (like chopped onions). Certain ingredients are the backbone of every recipe, yet may lead to a rise in blood pressure (like salt). Other ingredients assist the food to cook, yet cause heartburn when used in excess (like oil). Many ingredients give the food an incredible ‘zing’, but if added with a heavy hand, render the food almost inedible (like chilies).

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Poor yet Rich

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Monday, 01 January 2018 08:40

“This car is too slow!” complained one person. “This food is too salty!” moaned another. “This house is too dark!” muttered a third. “This water is too cold!” exclaimed a fourth. “This clothing is too hot!” groaned a fifth.

Show the first person a child in a rural area who has to walk 20km a day merely to attend school. His complaint will cease. Show the second person people living in utter starvation. He will forget about his complaint. Show the third person people sleeping on the streets. Let alone complaining, he will become very grateful. Show the fourth person people without water in drought stricken areas. He will never complain about cold water again. Show the fifth person people covering their bodies with torn and tattered clothing. His complaint will be no more.

South Africa is admittedly a country with its fair share of challenges. From a currency dropping lower than a sunken submarine to a crime level constantly skyrocketing, many people live in doom and gloom, depressed over the sad state of affairs. However, if we reflect over the plight of those less fortunate than ourselves, we will realize that we still enjoy innumerable blessings and favours of Allah Ta‘ala. In fact, blessings in dunya aside, Allah Ta‘ala has blessed us immensely in Deen.

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Upbringing of Children

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Monday, 01 January 2018 08:36

Correspondence of Hazrat Moulana Yunus Patel Saheb (rahimahullah)

Letter: 

Assalaamu ‘alaikum wa rahmatullahi wa barakaatuh

Respected Moulana

Alhamdulillah, I am in hijaab and punctual with salaah. I try to please Allah Ta‘ala and follow the sunnah. However, since I have had my daughter, I find bringing her up to be very trying and so I sometimes lose my temper. She is now two years old and very demanding, always wanting my attention and disrupting me.

Please guide me and advise me as to what I should do.

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The Pertinence of Priorities

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Monday, 22 January 2018 10:12

Juraij (rahimahullah) was a man from the Banu Israaeel who would exert himself in the ‘ibaadah (worship) of Allah Ta‘ala. Hence, he built himself a monastery in which he would reside (and devote himself to the worship of Allah Ta‘ala).

One day, his mother came to him while he was performing nafl salaah and called out to him, “O Juraij!” As he was engaged in performing salaah, Juraij thought to himself, “O Allah! My mother and my salaah! (i.e. which should I give preference to?)” Juraij (rahimahullah) decided to continue performing his salaah. Hence, not receiving a response from him, his mother turned and left.

The following day, the mother of Juraij (rahimahullah) again came to him while he was engaged in performing salaah and called out, “O Juraij!” Juraij (rahimahullah) again thought to himself, “O Allah! My mother and my salaah! (i.e. which should I give preference to?)” Juraij (rahimahullah) once again decided to continue performing his salaah. Hence, not receiving a response from him, his mother again turned and left.

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