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Blessings of Patience

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Saturday, 05 October 2019 15:55

Audio clip of Ml. Ahmad Paruk

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True Hijaab and Niqaab​

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Thursday, 03 October 2019 15:22

There was once a person who possessed a rare, exquisite piece of jewellery, studded with the finest of gemstones. Since he knew the value of the jewellery, and realised that there would be many unscrupulous individuals who would relish the chance to steal it from him, he ensured that he always kept it stored safely in a vault. On the odd occasion when he was forced to remove it from the vault, he employed guards and utilised every security measure imaginable to secure it from theft. However, in the back of his mind, he always acknowledged the stark reality – so long as it was out of the vault, it was at risk of being stolen, EVEN THOUGH he employed the best of guards and security. It was only within the recesses of the vault that his prized jewellery was truly secure. Hence, he knew, within his heart, that as far as possible, his jewellery would have to remain in the vault.

Since we all live in an age of insecurity, where burglaries and other forms of theft are rife and rampant, we can all relate to the example above. However, there is another example which is even more relevant than the one above – the example of the most valuable of all gems – the example of a Muslim woman. A Muslim woman and her hayaa are more valuable and precious than any gem or jewellery. Hence, just as jewellery remains in a vault for the sake of security, a Muslim woman is required to remain in the recesses of her home where her hayaa and imaan will remain safe and protected.

Read more: True Hijaab and Niqaab​

 

Outgrowing Excuses​

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Tuesday, 01 October 2019 10:00

Adversities, difficulties and calamities are part and parcel of life, as it is only in Jannah that a person will enjoy perpetual, uninterrupted happiness and joy. Hence, every person faces challenges and obstacles. The question is, “HOW do we react and respond to these adversities?”

While some adversities really are very difficult to overcome and have a major impact on one’s life, there are certain people who, at the very first instance, latch onto any and every difficulty as their convenient excuse to avoid all accountability and responsibility. In this regard, it is obvious that there will never be a shortage of excuses in one’s life. Hence, if a person adopts this mindset and attitude, he will NEVER ever progress, as he is content to stagnate and blame his lack of progress on some excuse or another. Such a person always has a ‘headache’, or ‘backache’, or is ‘not feeling well’, or is ‘feeling depressed’, etc.

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Precaution in Public Wealth​

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Monday, 30 September 2019 15:23

The precaution which Sayyiduna ‘Umar (radhiyallahu ‘anhu) exercised when dealing with public wealth was indeed proverbial. Below are just two of the many incidents which illustrate this invaluable quality that he possessed: 

On one occasion, some musk and ambergris (a type of perfume) arrived from Bahrain. (As it was public wealth,) Sayyiduna ‘Umar (radhiyallahu ‘anhu) said, “By Allah! I wish to find a woman who is proficient at weighing items so that she can weigh these perfumes for me, enabling me to distribute them equally between the Muslims.”

Hearing this, Sayyidah ‘Aatikah bintu Zaid (radhiyallahu ‘anha), the respected wife of Sayyiduna ‘Umar (radhiyallahu ‘anhu), offered to weigh it for him saying, “I am proficient at weighing. Bring it and I will weigh it for you.” However, Sayyiduna ‘Umar (radhiyallahu ‘anhu) declined her offer.

Read more: Precaution in Public Wealth​

 

The Manner of Raising and Educating Young Girls in the Past (Part 3)

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Thursday, 26 September 2019 09:12

“A Muslimah’s Guide to Living a Blissful Life” by Sayyidah Khairun Nisaa (rahimahallah) #9

Mothers would teach their daughters to deal with even the most difficult of challenges that related to maintaining hayaa (shame and modesty) in both an easy and pleasant manner, so that when these challenges did surface, the young girls did not find any difficulty in dealing with the situation.

Mothers would not allow their daughters to engage in anything that was against Deen and the sharee‘ah. Similarly, they would not allow them to read any literature besides the Quraan Majeed, hadeeth shareef and other kitaabs of Deen. In this regard, they would tell their daughters quite clearly, “To spend your time in (idle) things besides these (things of Deen) is an act of futility and is a waste.”

They would stress the importance of salaah and fasting on their daughters and would create the eagerness in them to recite the various forms of zikr and engage in du‘aa. They ensured that their daughters possessed all the kitaabs that related to various aspects of Deen. Hence, they would not carry out such actions or behave in such a manner that was contrary to Deen.

Read more: The Manner of Raising and Educating Young Girls in the Past (Part 3)

 

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