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Doggy Goat

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Last Updated on Thursday, 13 July 2017 13:59 Thursday, 13 July 2017 13:53

Ask our children:

1. Can we keep a pet dog?

2. Do Muslims lie and steal?

Now tell them the story:

There was an old farmer who had a pet goat. He used to play with it, feed it and make it sleep in his room every night. One day, he decided to take his goat for a walk. As he left his home, three hungry crooks saw him with his goat. They made a plan to steal the goat and have a big braai.

The first crook came to the farmer and said, “Wow! What a big dog you have!” The farmer became angry and shouted, “You fool! Can’t you see that it’s a goat?” The crook said, “No! It’s a dog!” and he walked away.

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Nurturing the Relationship

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Last Updated on Monday, 10 July 2017 15:39 Tuesday, 11 July 2017 12:33

There are few methods that express love as eloquently as speech. Hence, a newly-wed couple who have the misfortune of living apart for some time will often compensate for their separation by remaining glued to their phones, speaking to each other for hours on end. On the contrary, when two people have hatred and enmity for one another, they make it a point to avoid speaking to each other.

During the month of Ramadhaan, Muslims the world over remained glued to the Quraan Majeed, earnestly conversing with Allah Ta‘ala. The more they recited the Quraan Majeed, the more their love for Allah Ta‘ala grew and the closer to Him they became. However, how many of us have continued to converse with Allah Ta‘ala, through reciting the Quraan Majeed daily, as we used to in the month of Ramadhaan? Similarly, how many of us are still conversing with Allah Ta‘ala through the direct-line of du‘aa, as we used to during the month of Ramadhaan?

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The Deep Desire for Good Deeds

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Last Updated on Monday, 10 July 2017 15:13 Monday, 10 July 2017 15:06

Sa’d bin Abi Waqqaas (radhiyallahu ‘anhu) narrates the following:

I noticed my brother, ‘Umair bin Abi Waqqaas (radhiyallahu ‘anhu), attempting to remain hidden before Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam) inspected us for the departure to Badr. I thus asked him, “What is the matter, O my brother?” He replied, “I fear that Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam) will see me and regard me to be too small. Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam) will thus send me away, whereas I deeply desire to join the expedition as it is possible that Allah Ta‘ala will bless me with martyrdom.”

My brother thereafter came before Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam), and Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam) regarded him to be too small to join the expedition to Badr. Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam) thus sent him away saying, “Go back.” However, ‘Umair (radhiyallahu ‘anhu) began to cry (out of disappointment as he wished to join the expedition and be blessed with martyrdom). Seeing him cry, Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam) allowed him to join the expedition.

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Maintaining the Momentum

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Last Updated on Thursday, 06 July 2017 15:10 Thursday, 06 July 2017 15:06

How many people do you know who one day looked into the mirror or stood on the scale and announced, “Enough!” The digits on the scale and the reflection in the mirror are both unbiased and don’t hesitate to tell a person that it’s time for him to shed those extra kilos.

How many people thereafter sacrificed their scrumptious snacks and exerted themselves in exercise, gradually achieving their goal weight? The answer to both questions is – quite a few actually. However, an overwhelming amount of these people are unable to maintain their ideal weight and soon thereafter slip into their old rut of unhealthy and bad eating habits, only to regain the unwanted weight even faster than they had initially lost it.

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A ‘Raw’ Deal

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Last Updated on Thursday, 06 July 2017 10:17 Tuesday, 04 July 2017 15:44

إِنَّ الَّذِينَ يَشْتَرُونَ بِعَهْدِ اللَّـهِ وَأَيْمَانِهِمْ ثَمَنًا قَلِيلًا أُولَـٰئِكَ لَا خَلَاقَ لَهُمْ فِي الْآخِرَةِ وَلَا يُكَلِّمُهُمُ اللَّـهُ وَلَا يَنظُرُ إِلَيْهِمْ يَوْمَ الْقِيَامَةِ وَلَا يُزَكِّيهِمْ وَلَهُمْ عَذَابٌ أَلِيمٌ

Surely, those who take a small price in lieu of the covenant of Allah Ta‘ala and their oaths (i.e. they break the covenant of Allah Ta‘ala for paltry worldly gain), for them there is no share in the Hereafter, and Allah Ta‘ala will neither speak to them, nor will He look towards them on the Day of Judgement (with the gaze of mercy), nor will He purify them. For them there is a painful punishment. (Surah Aal ‘Imraan v77)

The Jews had pledged to Allah Ta‘ala to bring imaan in all the Ambiyaa (‘alaihimus salaam). Furthermore, their scriptures had mentioned that the final Nabi, Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasalllam), would come and even contained his description. However, they did not want the Jewish masses to accept Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam) and bring imaan in him – even though they knew him to be the true Nabi of Allah Ta‘ala. They thus altered the description of Nabi (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam) in the Torah and told the people that Nabi (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam) did not fit the description of the Torah. They did this so that they could maintain their control over the people. In essence, they sold their Deen to secure their material comfort.

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