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From the Horse’s Mouth

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Last Updated on Monday, 03 April 2017 09:00 Monday, 03 April 2017 07:00

‘Amr bin ‘Aas (radhiyallahu ‘anhu) narrates the following:

An army of the Muslims, over whom I was appointed as leader, once set out to fight in the path of Allah Ta‘ala. We continued to travel until we came to the city of Alexandria. On reaching Alexandria, the leader of the city announced to us, “Send someone from your army to me so that I may converse with him.” When I heard this request, I immediately said, “Nobody but I will go to him.” I thus emerged from the camp and went to meet him. With me was a translator, and the city leader had a translator with him as well. Two pulpits were placed for us and we thus sat. The following dialogue then ensued:

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Viewed from within the Veil (Part Two)

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Last Updated on Saturday, 01 April 2017 08:58 Saturday, 01 April 2017 06:50

The Fourth Step

The number of Muslims in Japan are few and are therefore seldom seen. Yet the response of the Japanese to my white khimaar was encouraging. I encountered neither rejection nor mockery. People assumed that I belonged to a religion, but they did not know which one. I overheard a young girl whispering to her friend that I was a Buddhist nun. Once, on a visit to Paris, I was in the same subway car with a Catholic nun. The Catholic nun’s covering and veil is a symbol of her devotion to God, and Christians respect and recognize her for this. Likewise, the hijaab is a symbol of devotion for every Muslim woman. I wonder why people who respect the nun’s covering criticize the hijaab of a Muslim, considering it instead a symbol of extremism or oppression!

Read more: Viewed from within the Veil (Part Two)

   

Viewed from within the Veil (Part One)

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Last Updated on Thursday, 30 March 2017 15:49 Thursday, 30 March 2017 15:25

The following is a Japanese woman’s account of her journey to Islam. She explains, in detail, the various phases that she went through as a new Muslimah and the various misunderstandings that she initially had regarding the position of hijaab and niqaab in Islam. From a simple headscarf, she progressed until she was covered from head to toe, embracing hijaab and niqaab in its entirety.

In the beginning of the 1990’s, when I embraced Islam in France, the controversy surrounding the wearing of hijaab in school was an extremely heated issue. The French were faced with economic problems which had resulted in high unemployment and social insecurity. This was predominantly felt in the big cities. The immigrant population, especially from Muslim countries, was seen as one of the causes of unemployment. The sight of hijaab in their towns and schools aggravated already negative attitudes towards Muslims. The majority of people thought that allowing students to wear hijaab was against the public education system’s principle of neutrality on religion. I had not yet become a Muslim, and I did not understand why the schools were so concerned over a mere piece of cloth worn on a student’s head. Observing the hijaab from the outside, I also did not understand its significance to Muslims. But I considered that in maintaining neutrality in matters of religion, the schools should still respect a student’s beliefs and his performance of religious duties. As long as this expression did not disturb the school’s discipline, it should not be prohibited.

Read more: Viewed from within the Veil (Part One)

   

The Bitter Pill with Sweet Results

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Last Updated on Tuesday, 28 March 2017 16:09 Tuesday, 28 March 2017 16:03

For everything in life, there is both a procedure and price. If a person wishes to build a house, he understands that the structure will cost him a substantial sum of money and that it will not spring up overnight. Similarly, if a person wishes to become a highly qualified specialist in the medical field, he will understand that he will first have to work his way through school, matriculate with good marks, gain admission into a university, pass through the various years, etc., before his aspiration can eventually be realized. This is the simple yet inescapable system that dominates in all facets of life.

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Allah Over All Else

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Last Updated on Monday, 10 April 2017 15:55 Monday, 27 March 2017 09:14

(The Life of Ummu Sulaim [radhiyallahu ‘anha] #2)

Ummu Sulaim (radhiyallahu ‘anha) was initially married to Maalik bin Nadhr, and it was from this union that Anas bin Maalik (radhiyallahu ‘anhu) was born. They were from the Ansaar and thus resided in Madeenah Munawwarah.

When Ummu Sulaim (radhiyallahu ‘anha) heard of Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam) and his message of Islam, her husband was away from home. Nevertheless, she immediately accepted Islam. When Maalik, her husband, returned home and realized that she had become a Muslim, he asked her, “Have you become a renegade?” Ummu Sulaim (radhiyallahu ‘anha) replied, “I am not a renegade. Rather, I have brought imaan in Muhammad (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam).”

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