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The Temperament of Foods

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Saturday, 10 November 2018 15:15

As discussed previously, temperament in Tibb consists of four qualities viz. heat, cold, moisture and dryness. These four qualities are found in foods as well, and hence foods also have their own temperament.

This means that foods will either be cooling or heating for the body, together with having an appropriate level of moisture or dryness. Accordingly, heating foods will increase the metabolism of the body, while cooling foods will slow the metabolism of the body. This has also been proven scientifically. Research by Dr Edward Howell has proven that when heating spices are consumed, the body dramatically increases the production of digestive enzymes.

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Bring out the Best in Him

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Thursday, 08 November 2018 10:32

No matter how hard this material world may try, it will never ever be perfect. Even if you fly first-class, you may have a person snoring nearby, spoiling your serenity. Even if you install the best bathroom fittings, they cannot give you water when the municipality decides to cut-off the mains. Even if the best of food is prepared, you don’t always have the appetite for it, and so on.

The point is that nothing in this material world will be perfect. Rather, you win some and you lose some. Everything will have its pros and cons. The trick is to avoid the cons while enjoying the pros. For example, if a person is stuck with a chipped mug, then instead of cutting his lip over and over on the chipped portion, he will turn the mug the other way and drink from the intact portion. Similarly, if he has a couch that is sagging on one side, then instead of collapsing into the sagging section, he will avoid it and sit on the other side.

The same applies in marriage. No spouse is going to be perfect. If he’s wealthy then maybe he’s ill-mannered, and if he possesses good character then perhaps he’s lazy. Hence, we should never walk into a marriage expecting to find our ‘Mr. Perfect’, as he will only turn up in Jannah.

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Hayaa Handbook​

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Monday, 05 November 2018 16:40

There was once an eagle that lived atop the highest of mountains, nesting among the crags. One day, the eagle felt curious about the village that lay at the foot of the mountain and decided to pay it a visit. As it landed on the ground below, an old lady suddenly threw a sack over it, capturing it and taking it to her home!

Once at home, she took the bewildered and frightened eagle out of the sack. Never having seen an eagle before, she looked at it and exclaimed, “You poor bird! Nobody’s been looking after you! Your nails are so long and filthy! And your beak has become curved and sharp! And your wings are overgrown! Shame!” Saying so, she clipped the eagle’s wings. Then, she trimmed its beak. Finally, she cut its talons.

Obviously, that was the end of the eagle. With its wings trimmed, it could no longer fly. With its talons trimmed, it could no longer hunt, and with its beak cut, it could no longer eat. What seemed like kindness was, in reality, absolute cruelty to the eagle as it effectively killed the bird. Furthermore, it obliterated the beauty and unique features of the eagle, which lay in its curved beak, hooked talons and large, powerful wings, and rendered the eagle indistinguishable from an overgrown chicken.

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Allah before Emotions​

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Monday, 05 November 2018 15:41

Sayyidah Asmaa (radhiyallahu ‘anha) was the daughter of Sayyiduna Abu Bakr Siddeeq (radhiyallahu ‘anhu) and the half-sister of Sayyidah ‘Aaishah (radhiyallahu ‘anha). Sayyiduna Abu Bakr (radhiyallahu ‘anhu) had divorced the mother of Sayyidah Asmaa (radhiyallahu ‘anha) during the pre-Islamic era, thereafter marrying Sayyidah Ummu Rumaan (radhiyallahu ‘anha) who later bore him Sayyidah ‘Aaishah (radhiyallahu ‘anha).

During the period of the treaty of Hudaibiyah, the mother of Sayyidah Asmaa (radhiyallahu ‘anha) came to Madeenah Munawwarah with her son, Haarith. Her name was Qutailah, and she had not accepted Islam. On arriving in Madeenah Munawwarah, she wished to visit her daughter, Sayyidah Asmaa (radhiyallahu ‘anha). She had brought some gifts for her, and also wished to take some financial assistance from Sayyidah Asmaa (radhiyallahu ‘anha).

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The Irreplaceable Asset

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Thursday, 01 November 2018 08:32

If a person’s home burns down, it can be rebuilt or another home can be bought… If a car is stolen or wrecked, it can be replaced or repaired… If wealth is lost, it can be recovered or re-earned… If a child is lost, then even though the child cannot be replaced, one can still have another child… However, if TIME is lost, it can never be recovered or replaced, and there is nothing in the world that can compensate for lost time.

Whether a person is healthy or sick, young or old, wealthy or poor, intelligent or unintelligent, no matter who he is or where he is – he cannot escape time. As the clock ticks and moments pass, his death draws ever closer. Every moment that passes is relegated to history, to be remembered but never relived.

We all have aspirations and ambitions. “Perform my qadhaa salaah… Observe my qadhaa fasts… Ask so-and-so to forgive me… Repent from my sins… Change my life…” However, procrastination is the thief of time. We always decide that we’ll start ‘tomorrow’… Until it becomes the following day… And then after the holidays… The problem is that death does not discriminate, and death is not deterred by excuses. Death can strike at any moment. In order to secure our Jannah before we die, we need to make the change not today, but IMMEDIATELY.

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