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Internet Abuse

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Last Updated on Tuesday, 25 April 2017 09:17

Question:

Assalaamu ‘alaikum

I was brought up not allowed to use the internet, watch TV, etc. However, I recently started a course which required the use of the internet. I try my best to only use it for the work required, but time and time again, I end up using it for other stuff. Though it’s not always haraam stuff that I use the internet for, it does waste time. Also, lots of times, I get caught up in watching YouTube videos and though I know it’s not right, I just seem unable to stop. No matter how many promises I make not to use it for anything other than course related work, in the end, I still do.

If Moulana could please advise on how to stop this as I am aware it’s wrong and want to stop, but no matter how much I try, I still get caught up in it. 

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Feeling Lonely

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Last Updated on Monday, 03 April 2017 15:46

Question:

Assalaamu ‘alaikum

I am a 24 year old female. Recently, I have decided to try my best in fulfilling the laws of Allah Ta‘ala. However, I find that I am constantly sad whenever I am alone. When I am with company, I forget the sadness. I feel very lonely. I live alone with my parents and most of my family live far from home. I’m not the type who goes out much and barely have friends to speak to. 

I want to get married, however nothing has worked out so far. I do know that everything is in the hands of Allah Ta‘ala and I have accepted this. 

Also, my mother is constantly finding faults with whatever I do and this has been getting to me. I have tried speaking to her about it in a nice way. However, I am told that I am being disrespectful. 

Please advise me with some zikr, etc., or routine I can follow so I do not waste away time over thinking about matters which I have no control over, as well as a du‘aa that I can read for getting married.

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Viewed from within the Veil (Part Two)

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Last Updated on Saturday, 01 April 2017 08:58

The Fourth Step

The number of Muslims in Japan are few and are therefore seldom seen. Yet the response of the Japanese to my white khimaar was encouraging. I encountered neither rejection nor mockery. People assumed that I belonged to a religion, but they did not know which one. I overheard a young girl whispering to her friend that I was a Buddhist nun. Once, on a visit to Paris, I was in the same subway car with a Catholic nun. The Catholic nun’s covering and veil is a symbol of her devotion to God, and Christians respect and recognize her for this. Likewise, the hijaab is a symbol of devotion for every Muslim woman. I wonder why people who respect the nun’s covering criticize the hijaab of a Muslim, considering it instead a symbol of extremism or oppression!

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Viewed from within the Veil (Part One)

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Last Updated on Thursday, 30 March 2017 15:49

The following is a Japanese woman’s account of her journey to Islam. She explains, in detail, the various phases that she went through as a new Muslimah and the various misunderstandings that she initially had regarding the position of hijaab and niqaab in Islam. From a simple headscarf, she progressed until she was covered from head to toe, embracing hijaab and niqaab in its entirety.

In the beginning of the 1990’s, when I embraced Islam in France, the controversy surrounding the wearing of hijaab in school was an extremely heated issue. The French were faced with economic problems which had resulted in high unemployment and social insecurity. This was predominantly felt in the big cities. The immigrant population, especially from Muslim countries, was seen as one of the causes of unemployment. The sight of hijaab in their towns and schools aggravated already negative attitudes towards Muslims. The majority of people thought that allowing students to wear hijaab was against the public education system’s principle of neutrality on religion. I had not yet become a Muslim, and I did not understand why the schools were so concerned over a mere piece of cloth worn on a student’s head. Observing the hijaab from the outside, I also did not understand its significance to Muslims. But I considered that in maintaining neutrality in matters of religion, the schools should still respect a student’s beliefs and his performance of religious duties. As long as this expression did not disturb the school’s discipline, it should not be prohibited.

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Etiquettes of Speech

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Last Updated on Thursday, 16 March 2017 14:22

1. Speak clearly and in a manner that is easy to understand. Hence, do not speak ambiguously or unclearly. Similarly, be to the point and do not mumble.

2. Always speak to people from the front. Do not stand or sit behind them and speak to them.

3. When a person is speaking to you, give them your complete attention.

4. Do not interrupt a person who is speaking until he completes what he needs to say.

5. Think before speaking.

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