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Viewed from within the Veil (Part Two)

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Last Updated on Saturday, 01 April 2017 08:58

The Fourth Step

The number of Muslims in Japan are few and are therefore seldom seen. Yet the response of the Japanese to my white khimaar was encouraging. I encountered neither rejection nor mockery. People assumed that I belonged to a religion, but they did not know which one. I overheard a young girl whispering to her friend that I was a Buddhist nun. Once, on a visit to Paris, I was in the same subway car with a Catholic nun. The Catholic nun’s covering and veil is a symbol of her devotion to God, and Christians respect and recognize her for this. Likewise, the hijaab is a symbol of devotion for every Muslim woman. I wonder why people who respect the nun’s covering criticize the hijaab of a Muslim, considering it instead a symbol of extremism or oppression!

Read more: Viewed from within the Veil (Part Two)

 

Viewed from within the Veil (Part One)

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Last Updated on Thursday, 30 March 2017 15:49

The following is a Japanese woman’s account of her journey to Islam. She explains, in detail, the various phases that she went through as a new Muslimah and the various misunderstandings that she initially had regarding the position of hijaab and niqaab in Islam. From a simple headscarf, she progressed until she was covered from head to toe, embracing hijaab and niqaab in its entirety.

In the beginning of the 1990’s, when I embraced Islam in France, the controversy surrounding the wearing of hijaab in school was an extremely heated issue. The French were faced with economic problems which had resulted in high unemployment and social insecurity. This was predominantly felt in the big cities. The immigrant population, especially from Muslim countries, was seen as one of the causes of unemployment. The sight of hijaab in their towns and schools aggravated already negative attitudes towards Muslims. The majority of people thought that allowing students to wear hijaab was against the public education system’s principle of neutrality on religion. I had not yet become a Muslim, and I did not understand why the schools were so concerned over a mere piece of cloth worn on a student’s head. Observing the hijaab from the outside, I also did not understand its significance to Muslims. But I considered that in maintaining neutrality in matters of religion, the schools should still respect a student’s beliefs and his performance of religious duties. As long as this expression did not disturb the school’s discipline, it should not be prohibited.

Read more: Viewed from within the Veil (Part One)

 

Etiquettes of Speech

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Last Updated on Thursday, 16 March 2017 14:22

1. Speak clearly and in a manner that is easy to understand. Hence, do not speak ambiguously or unclearly. Similarly, be to the point and do not mumble.

2. Always speak to people from the front. Do not stand or sit behind them and speak to them.

3. When a person is speaking to you, give them your complete attention.

4. Do not interrupt a person who is speaking until he completes what he needs to say.

5. Think before speaking.

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Lying Child

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Last Updated on Monday, 03 April 2017 15:34

Question:

Assalaamu ‘alaikum

My son, who is almost three years old, has started telling imaginary tales. He also speaks untruths e.g. when asked if he has packed his toys, he replies yes, whereas he hasn't done so. How should such incidents be dealt with now so that he does not grow up with the habit of telling lies? 

Answer:

Bismihi Ta‘ala

Wa ‘alaikumus salaam wa rahmatullahi wa barkaatuh

Respected Sister in Islam

The following are a few steps that you should take in order to try and assist your son to cease telling lies:

1. Repeatedly drum the lesson, in an endearing way, that Allah Ta‘ala does not like those who tell lies.

2. Explain the hadeeth that when a person lies, a smell emanates from his mouth which the angels can perceive. They (the angels of mercy) then flee up to one mile’s distance. How terrible is this!

3. If he is found to be lying, deprive him of some privilege for that day.

4. If he has spoken the truth, acknowledge it and reward him – even if it be some words of praise or a hug.

May Allah Ta’ala make him an honest and truthful servant of His. 

Answered by:

Uswatul Muslimah Panel of ‘Ulama

 

Rights of the Daughter-in-Law

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Last Updated on Friday, 24 February 2017 21:08

Question:

Assalaamu ‘alaikum

I require some advice regarding the rights of daughter-in-laws. My mother-in-law swore at me and said that I was never a daughter-in-law to her so she doesn’t care and doesn’t want anything to do with me. My father-in-law even called me shouting and screaming and telling me that my mother-in-law won’t ask for maaf and I must lower myself. He then cut the call. 

After this I am completely heartbroken as well as disheartened towards them. I do not want to go to their home or see them anymore. Please advise the best and correct way to handle this situation. It is very difficult to suppress my feelings, because every time I see them I will remember how disrespectful and demeaning they are to the daughter-in-law of the house. Is this fair to me as a daughter-in-law and what are my rights? 

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