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Hayaa Handbook

How to Ask?​

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Last Updated on Tuesday, 09 July 2019 15:26

There was once a person who felt hot in his home. Since there was no means to cool the home from within, such as a fan or an air conditioner, he was compelled to bring in coolness from out of the home. However, where merely opening the window would have sufficed, he exceeded the point of necessity and chose to open the entire front door, soon suffering a robbery.

As discussed previously, hayaa should not prevent us from acquiring necessary Deeni guidance and finding out the masaa-il (rulings) that we need to know. However, we should not lose our hayaa when doing so. Hence, although there is a need to communicate for Deeni guidance, it should be kept to the point of necessity while remaining within the parameters of sharee‘ah. If we lose sight of the boundaries and exceed the limits, then instead of opening a window to improve our Deen, we will ‘open the door’ of fitnah and risk damaging our imaan.

Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam) was the paragon of hayaa and hence even when imparting the necessary knowledge to the women of the Ummah, he maintained the highest levels of hayaa.

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To Ask or Not to Ask?​

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Last Updated on Monday, 15 April 2019 10:14

Through the journey of life, one’s path will contain pot holes, bumps, gravel patches and roadblocks, just as it will contain captivating scenery, rest stops and straight, clear sections, free of danger. In many instances, the pot hole or bump will be an entirely new one, never experienced before. On encountering this obstacle, one will wonder, “How do I navigate it successfully?” The simple answer is that one should refer to someone who has knowledge of the path and understands what will be pleasing to Allah Ta‘ala. Through the guidance of such a person, one will be able to overcome the obstacle without suffering a loss.

In life, obstacles come in different forms and guises. Sometimes, we are faced with marital problems, either with our husband himself or our in-laws. At other times, we may be faced with a predicament involving our children, while there may be times when we have a personal problem in our life such as the addiction to a certain destructive sin.

Read more: To Ask or Not to Ask?​

 

Adopting Hayaa before Allah​

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Last Updated on Tuesday, 05 March 2019 15:27

When the topic of hayaa is discussed, it is generally aspects such as hayaa in dressing or speech that come to mind. However, although these aspects are fundamental to the topic of hayaa, there is more to hayaa than just these aspects. In essence, we tend to restrict the concept of hayaa to our relationships and interaction with other people, whereas an often overlooked aspect is hayaa before Allah Ta‘ala, our Creator.

Sayyiduna ‘Abdullah bin Mas‘ood (radhiyallahu ‘anhu) reports that on one occasion, Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam) addressed the Sahaabah (radhiyallahu ‘anhum) and said, “Adopt hayaa before Allah, as hayaa ought to be adopted.” The Sahaabah (radhiyallahu ‘anhum) replied, “O Rasul of Allah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam)! Alhamdulillah, we do have hayaa before Allah Ta‘ala.” Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam) responded, “Adopting hayaa before Allah, as hayaa ought to be adopted, is not what you understand it to be. Rather, adopting hayaa before Allah, as hayaa ought to be adopted, is for you to safeguard your head and all that it includes, and your belly and all that it encompasses, and you should remember death and the disintegration of the body (in the grave), and whoever intends acquiring the Aakhirah, he should shun the adornment of the world. The one who holds firmly to these qualities has adopted hayaa before Allah Ta‘ala as hayaa ought to be adopted.” (Sunan Tirmizi #2458)

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Am I Normal???​

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Last Updated on Tuesday, 22 January 2019 15:48

We are all familiar with the terms ‘normal’ and ‘natural’. However, if asked to furnish a definition for normal and natural, how would we respond?

In the modern world, ‘normal’ is often defined as that which conforms to the norms of society and is deemed acceptable by society at large. However, it is obvious that this cannot be the yardstick by which we measure normality. If it were so, we would be forced to regard the behaviour of a cannibal tribe casually nibbling on their neighbours as ‘normal’ since their entire tribe and society accept this form of behaviour. Additionally, the yardstick of ‘normal’ would continue to sway and shift before the wind of society’s ever-changing whims and fancies, ideals and ideas. In a nutshell, this would not signify the true ‘normal’, but would rather represent the collective inclinations and tendencies of society at large.

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Hayaa Handbook​

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Last Updated on Tuesday, 06 November 2018 13:39

There was once an eagle that lived atop the highest of mountains, nesting among the crags. One day, the eagle felt curious about the village that lay at the foot of the mountain and decided to pay it a visit. As it landed on the ground below, an old lady suddenly threw a sack over it, capturing it and taking it to her home!

Once at home, she took the bewildered and frightened eagle out of the sack. Never having seen an eagle before, she looked at it and exclaimed, “You poor bird! Nobody’s been looking after you! Your nails are so long and filthy! And your beak has become curved and sharp! And your wings are overgrown! Shame!” Saying so, she clipped the eagle’s wings. Then, she trimmed its beak. Finally, she cut its talons.

Obviously, that was the end of the eagle. With its wings trimmed, it could no longer fly. With its talons trimmed, it could no longer hunt, and with its beak cut, it could no longer eat. What seemed like kindness was, in reality, absolute cruelty to the eagle as it effectively killed the bird. Furthermore, it obliterated the beauty and unique features of the eagle, which lay in its curved beak, hooked talons and large, powerful wings, and rendered the eagle indistinguishable from an overgrown chicken.

Read more: Hayaa Handbook​