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There are many challenges and obstacles which we face in our effort to reach Allah Ta‘ala and become His special friends. Be it peer-pressure, family frustration or the lack of parental cooperation, the trials are various and affect people differently.

One of the most effective ways of gaining courage and motivation is to read the inspirational stories of other people who despite facing similar difficulties to ourselves, rose to the challenge and beat the odds to successfully acquire the love of Allah Ta‘ala and change their lives.

This category contains true stories of Muslimahs who are not merely our mothers and sisters – but are true inspirations to the women of the Ummah.

Do you have a personal story to share? Or do you perhaps know of someone whose life underwent a complete revolution as they strove in the quest for piety? If so, write and submit your story to info@uswatulmuslimah.co.za

Modern to Modest

Living my Dream

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Last Updated on Wednesday, 20 December 2017 13:54

Assalaamu ‘alaikum

In the name of Allah, the Most Kind, the Most Merciful. 

My journey into purdah was not an easy one. I left school at the age of 14 and went to madrasah. It was my father’s dream for us, his daughters, to be in purdah and become ‘Aalimahs, so I did it to please him.

After I started wearing it, I hated the idea of it. I used to see other girls with tight jeans and short tops with their hair done up and I used to long for that. Also, besides that, you receive constant ridicule from ignorant people. All of that used to bother me so much that I would cry for days. I just didn't want to do it anymore! I used to think, “Why should I cover myself when I have everything to show?” How naive I was... I had forgotten that women were jewels that needed to be protected.

Read more: Living my Dream

   

Modern to Modest Re-launch

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Last Updated on Wednesday, 13 December 2017 15:41

The saying “no pain, no gain”, although clichéd (overused), expresses a concept that all people acknowledge and understand – that in order to gain, one must be prepared to sacrifice. However, sacrifice is something for which very few people are prepared, as it takes one out of the ‘comfort zone’ into unfamiliar, trial-filled territory.

When most people contemplate their goals, they view the sacrifices that are necessary to achieve them and lose courage, thinking to themselves, “I can never do this, it’s impossible!”

Hence, one of the most effective ways to gain motivation is to consider other people who are just like us and faced the same challenges as us, yet overcame the seemingly insurmountable odds and achieved their goal.

Read more: Modern to Modest Re-launch

   

A Modest Muslimah Inspires to Islam

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Last Updated on Thursday, 17 August 2017 15:50

The following is the first hand account of a female American doctor who accepted Islam due to a young Muslimah’s piety:

I am a gynaecologist and have been working in a hospital in America for the past eight years. Last year, a young, Muslim, Arab girl arrived in the hospital in the throes of labour. The labour pain was naturally severe and excruciating, yet I did not witness even a single tear fall from the eyes of this young girl.

Nevertheless, my shift was nearing its end, and so I informed the young girl that I would be going home and that another doctor (who was a male) would be arriving shortly to deliver her child. Whereas this young girl had not shed a single tear or emitted a single moan or complaint until now, on hearing that I was leaving, she suddenly began to cry and moan earnestly while insisting, “No! No! Not a man!”

Read more: A Modest Muslimah Inspires to Islam

   

Viewed from within the Veil (Part Two)

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Last Updated on Saturday, 01 April 2017 08:58

The Fourth Step

The number of Muslims in Japan are few and are therefore seldom seen. Yet the response of the Japanese to my white khimaar was encouraging. I encountered neither rejection nor mockery. People assumed that I belonged to a religion, but they did not know which one. I overheard a young girl whispering to her friend that I was a Buddhist nun. Once, on a visit to Paris, I was in the same subway car with a Catholic nun. The Catholic nun’s covering and veil is a symbol of her devotion to God, and Christians respect and recognize her for this. Likewise, the hijaab is a symbol of devotion for every Muslim woman. I wonder why people who respect the nun’s covering criticize the hijaab of a Muslim, considering it instead a symbol of extremism or oppression!

Read more: Viewed from within the Veil (Part Two)

   

Viewed from within the Veil (Part One)

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Last Updated on Thursday, 30 March 2017 15:49

The following is a Japanese woman’s account of her journey to Islam. She explains, in detail, the various phases that she went through as a new Muslimah and the various misunderstandings that she initially had regarding the position of hijaab and niqaab in Islam. From a simple headscarf, she progressed until she was covered from head to toe, embracing hijaab and niqaab in its entirety.

In the beginning of the 1990’s, when I embraced Islam in France, the controversy surrounding the wearing of hijaab in school was an extremely heated issue. The French were faced with economic problems which had resulted in high unemployment and social insecurity. This was predominantly felt in the big cities. The immigrant population, especially from Muslim countries, was seen as one of the causes of unemployment. The sight of hijaab in their towns and schools aggravated already negative attitudes towards Muslims. The majority of people thought that allowing students to wear hijaab was against the public education system’s principle of neutrality on religion. I had not yet become a Muslim, and I did not understand why the schools were so concerned over a mere piece of cloth worn on a student’s head. Observing the hijaab from the outside, I also did not understand its significance to Muslims. But I considered that in maintaining neutrality in matters of religion, the schools should still respect a student’s beliefs and his performance of religious duties. As long as this expression did not disturb the school’s discipline, it should not be prohibited.

Read more: Viewed from within the Veil (Part One)

   

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